• Sarasate: Zigeunerweisen (Zino Francescatti)1959
  • Zino Francescatti and Robert Casadesus - Beethoven: Violin Sonatas N. 5 and 9 Cd CD Cover
  • Zino Francescatti and Robert Casadesus - Beethoven: Violin Sonatas N. 5 and 9 Inside CD Cover
  • Zino FRANCESCATTI

ZINO FRANCESCATTI PLAYS VIOLIN CONCERTOS(2CD)

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That is a plausible theory, but i think it comes down to the fact that Zino Francescatti was born to play the violin. His tone is unique even for the time period he was in. It was beautiful, sweet when necessary, and had surprising grandeur for someone who is often described as 'charming' violinistically, as 'charming' is not a term one usually associates with heaven-storming grandeur. Francescatti's bowarm was a force of nature and his interpretations were always gallic, never forced or brusque. His technique was so evenly calibrated in such a way that it often takes effort to notice only one aspect of his remarkable playing, so easy is it to be drawn into the sum of its parts. He always performed with perfected musical taste and maturity. I grew up on his Vieuxtemps no.4 and Paganini no.1 as well as his Beethoven sonatas with Casadesus. He was indeed one of the very greats. His interviews in The Way They Play are also very very informative and i agree with his decision to retire at the age of seventy 'so as not to technically disintegrate in public.' Such strategic thinking showed a lot of sagacity as far as leaving a strong legacy behind.

I went home and rummaged through my parents' records. I found one, played it, and fell in love with the sound on that recording -- even on a portable record player. The piece? The Mendelssohn concerto. The player? Zino Francescatti.

Reviews

Zino Francescatti, Vol. 1 - Microsoft Store

Zino Francescatti was born in Marseilles, to a musical family. Both parents were violinists. His father had studied with Camillo Sivori, and also played the cello. Zino studied violin from age three, and was quickly recognized as a child prodigy. He began performing at the age of five and made his debut playing Beethoven's Violin Concerto at age 10.